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The aspectual verb wêze
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The aspectual verb wêze may be conjugated in the perfect tense either with wêzebe or with hawwehave.

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The aspectual verb wêze can be used to indicate a change of location, but its meaning is restricted to denote absence, more specifically, absence from a source location that is not overtly expressed. As a result, this construction may be referred to as the absentive. An example is given below:

Example 1

Wêr is Watze? Hy is nei de stêd ta
Wêr is Watze he is to the town to
Where is Watze? He has gone to town

The perfective motional interpretation is carried solely by the verb wêzebe and its accompanying goal Adposition Phrase (PP). The source is understood from the context to be the topic's usual location. Source PPs are never or rarely spelled out in this type of clause.

In case the source is spelled out, the perfect participle of geango must be present (see predication and noun incorporation on the absence of the infinitival or participial forms of this light verb and some others).

Example 2

a. ?*Wêr is Watze? Hy is fan Kollum nei Ljouwert ta
Wêr is Watze he is from Kollum to the town to
Where is Watze? He has gone from Kollum to Ljouwert
b. Wêr is Watze? Hy is fan Kollum nei Ljouwert ta gien
Wêr is Watze he is from Kollum to the town to gone
Where is Watze? He has gone from Kollum to Ljouwert

It was shown that verbs denoting a change of location are conjugated with wêzebe, that is, they display unaccusative behaviour. The aspectual verb wêzebe, however, is an exception in that it can be conjugated with either havehawwe or wêzebe.

Example 3

a. Watze hat nei De Jouwer ta west
Watze has to De jouwer to been
Watze has been away to De Jouwer
b. Watze is nei De Jouwer ta west
Watze is to De jouwer to been
Watze has been away to De Jouwer

This variation is present regardless of the verb's pattern of complementation. So it is also found in case the verb is accompanied by an Adjective Phrase (AP):

Example 4

a. Watze hat siik west
Watze has ill been
Watze has been ill
b. Watze is siik west
Watze is ill been
Watze has been ill

The variation is chiefly found in the position of the tensed verb. In non-finite position, the verb hawwehave is generally used:

Example 5

a. ?*Nei lang siik west te wêzen
after long ill been to be
After having been ill for a long time
b. Nei lang siik west te hawwen
after long ill been to have
After having been ill for a long time
c. ?*Dat moast dus in Friezinne west wêze
that must therefore a Frisian.woman been be
She must have been a Frisian
d. Dat moast dus in Friezinne west hawwe
that must therefore a Frisian.woman been have
She must have been a Frisian
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More details can be found in Hoekstra (2004).

References:
  • Hoekstra, Eric & Wolf, Henk2004West hat, west is: it helptiidwurd fan it perfektum by 'wêze'Us wurk: tydskrift foar Frisistyk5385-105
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