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Stress in prepositional compounds
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An adposition (a preposition or a postpositon) can combine with a verb (V), a preposition (P) or a reciprocal pronoun. The resulting compounds belong to different word categories.

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[+] Compounds of a verb and an adposition

Examples of compounds consisting of a verb stem and a postposition are provided in (1). They have stress on the second constituent.

Example 1

flapút [[flap][út]] [flap.'yt] blabbermouth
fretop [[fret][op]] [frɛt.'op] glutton
blaaswei [[blaas][wei]] [bla:z.'vaj] an insignificant person
falom [[fal][om]] [fɔl.'om] ruin
krûpyn [[krûp][yn]] [krup.'in] poky little house; box bed
komôf [[kom][ôf]] [kom.'ɔ:] descent, origin
karút [[kar][út]] [kar.'yt] (free) choice

These compounds belong to the word category noun (N), so they are exocentric. They are likely to be cases of conversion of a separable (particle) verb or of the combination of a verb and a (fixed) preposition. Take, for instance, fretopglutton and flapútblabbermouth, which are related to the particle verb opfretteeat up, to devour and the verbal combination (wat) derút flappesay (things) in an unthoughtful way, respectively.

[+] Compounds of two prepositions

Compounds consisting of two prepositions, examples of which are provided in (2), have stress on the second constituent.

Example 2

efteryn [[efter][yn]] [ˌɛf.tər.'in] at the rear
boppe-oan [[boppe][oan]] [ˌbop.pə.'oən] on top of
foarút [[foar][út]] [fwar.'yt] in advance; forward
tuskentroch [[tusken][troch]] [ˌtøs.kən.'trox] in-between

These compounds function as adverbial adjuncts.

[+] Compounds consisting of a preposition and the reciprocal pronoun

There are compounds consisting of a preposition and the reciprocal pronoun. As the examples in (3) show, they have stress on the first constituent.

Example 3

mei-inoar [[mei][inoar]] ['maj.jə.ˌnwar] together
yninoar [[yn][inoar]] ['i.nn̩.ˌnwar] assembled
útinoar [[út][inoar]] ['y.tn̩.ˌnwar] apart, separated
trochinoar [[troch][inoar]] ['troɣ.ɣə.ˌnwar] muddled up

The combination of a preposition and the reciprocal pronoun functions as an adverbial adjunct. From a syntactic point of view, we have to do with phrases here, so we would expect phrase-final stress on the pronoun, as is the case in the Dutch counterparts. Stress, however, is on the preposition, which is an indication that these phrases function as compounds from a phonological point of view. The fact that yninoarassembled and útinoarapart, separated can contain a syllabic consonant ‒ a word phenomenon ‒ testifies to the tight phonological bond between the preposition and the pronoun. Also, it is not without significance that they are written as one word.

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