• Dutch
  • Frisian
  • Afrikaans
Show full table of contents
Adjectival conversion
quickinfo

Conversion to adjectives almost exclusively occurs on the basis of verbs. Nominal bases are restricted to a few material nouns from the non-native stock. An example is aluminiumaluminium, which may turn to an adjective, as in the example in aluminium fytsan aluminium bicycle. Strikingly, such converted adjectives are not inflected. Most adjectives denoting a material are derived by adding the suffix -en, however.

Conversion of verbs into adjectives occurs on a large scale; however, only with participles. Both present and past participles may be transposed, and both patterns are productive. The verb falleto fall, for instance, has the form fallend(e) as its present, en fallen as its past participle. Phrases like de fallende blêdenthe falling leaves and de fallene blêdenthe fallen leaves are illustrations of the phenomenon.

readmore

More details on converted participles can be found by following the corresponding link:

References:
    Suggestions for further reading ▼
    phonology
    • Dutch
    • Frisian
    • Afrikaans
    Show more ▼
    morphology
    • Dutch
    • Frisian
    • Afrikaans
    • Pseudo-participles
      [68%] Dutch > Morphology > Word formation > Derivation
    • Adjectival inflection
      [67%] Dutch > Morphology > Inflection
    • Separable complex verbs (SCVs)
      [65%] Dutch > Morphology > Word formation > Compounding
    • ver-
      [65%] Dutch > Morphology > Word formation > Derivation > Verbs > Verbal prefixes
    • -(e)lijk
      [64%] Dutch > Morphology > Word formation > Derivation > Adjectives > Adjectival suffixes
    • V > A
      [68%] Frisian > Morphology > Word formation > Derivation > Conversion > Adjectival conversion
    • -heid, -ens and -ichheid
      [65%] Frisian > Morphology > Word formation > Derivation > Suffixation > Nominal suffixes > Adjective as base
    • N > V
      [65%] Frisian > Morphology > Word formation > Derivation > Conversion > Verbal conversion
    • Verbal suffixes
      [65%] Frisian > Morphology > Word formation > Derivation > Suffixation
    • -ig
      [65%] Frisian > Morphology > Word formation > Derivation > Suffixation > Verbal suffixes > Noun as base
    Show more ▼
    syntax
    • Dutch
    • Frisian
    • Afrikaans
    • 1.3.1.4. Ge-nominalization
      [65%] Dutch > Syntax > Nouns and Noun Phrases > 1 Characterization and classification > 1.3. Derivation of nouns > 1.3.1. Deverbal nouns
    • 1.3.2. Deadjectival nouns
      [65%] Dutch > Syntax > Nouns and Noun Phrases > 1 Characterization and classification > 1.3. Derivation of nouns
    • 1.3.3. Relational adjectives
      [65%] Dutch > Syntax > Adjectives and Adjective Phrases > 1 Characteristics and classification > 1.3. A semantic classification
    • 1.3. Inflection
      [65%] Dutch > Syntax > Verbs and Verb Phrases > 1 Characterization and classification
    • Introduction
      [64%] Dutch > Syntax > Adjectives and Adjective Phrases > 1 Characteristics and classification
    • Characteristics and classification
      [66%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Adjective Phrases
    • Mood
      [64%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Verbs and Verb Phrases > 1. Characterization and classification
    • Complementation
      [64%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Adjective Phrases
    • The regular passive
      [63%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Verbs and Verb Phrases > 3. Alternations > 3.2 Alternations involving the external argument > 3.2.1 Passivisation
    • Other constructions
      [63%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Adjective Phrases > Modification and Degree Quantification
    Show more ▼
    cite
    print