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Kind partitive
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The noun soartekind is used to refer to a specific class of things.

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The noun soartekind has the common gender if it refers to a specific class of things:

Example 1

Dy nije soarte apen dy't krekt ûntdutsen is
that.CG new.CG kind monkeys that.CG just discovered is
That new species of monkeys that has just been discovered

The preposition may be present:

Example 2

Dy nije soarte fan apen dy't krekt ûntdutsen is
that.CG new.CG kind of monkeys that.CG just discovered is
That new species of monkeys that has just been discovered

However, soartespecies can also be used to refer to a vague, pragmatically defined class. In that case, it has the neuter gender, and the noun is preferably spelled without a schwa. The meaning also differs depending on whether it is definite or indefinite. If it is indefinite, it may be that the animal referred to is not even a monkey:

Example 3

In soart fan apen of ykhoarntsjes
a kind of monkeys or squirrels
Some sort of monkey or squirrel.

If it is definite, the word aapmonkey may take on its metaphorical meaning of snotty boy:

Example 4

Dat soart apen
that kind monkeys
That sort of snotty boys

However, these last two examples may also have the rigid well-defined kind reading.

References:
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