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-aan
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The suffix -aan derives personal nouns from nouns. This unproductive, non-Germanic suffix only occurs in a few words, always with a non-Germanic base form. An example is parochyparish > parochiaanparishioner.

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[+] General input

The list of derivations with -aan is limited. Examples are given in the table below:

Table 1
Base form Derivation
parochyparish parochiaanparishioner
YndiëIndia YndiaanIndian
FransiskusFranciscus fransiskaanFranciscan
AfrikaAfrica AfrikaanAfrican
DominikusDominicus dominikaanDominican
MohammedMohammed mohammedaanfollower of Mohammed
All derivations have common gender, and their meaning differs between "follower of a certain person" and "inhabitant of a certain region".

[+] Phonological properties

The suffix -aan bears the main stress of the word: paROchy > parochiAAN, MOhammed > mohammeDAAN.

[+] Morphological potentials

If the derivations show up in the first part of a compound, than a linking element -e- is added: mohammedan-e-buertneighbourhood of Mohammedans or yndian-e-ferhalenwild tales. They can be input for other suffixes as well, like -sk as in Afrikaansk itenAfrican food.

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x Literature

This topic is based on Hoekstra (1998:101).

References:
  • Hoekstra, Jarich1998Fryske wurdfoarmingLjouwertFryske Akademy
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